Monday, November 10, 2014

Three Interesting Women Against Vaccination

"We are a non-vaccinating family, but I make no claims about people’s individual decisions. We based ours on research and discussions with our pediatrician, and we’ve been happy with that decision, but obviously there’s a lot of controversy about it." ~ Mayim Hoya Bialik, PhD in Neuroscience

Dr. Suzanne Humphries - Are Vaccines Safe ?

Dr. Suzanne Humphries, a highly educated medical doctor with specialities in internal medicine and nephrology talks about vaccines, diseases and health in an interview with Canal 2nd Opinion recorded in Ängelholm, Sweden in september 2014.

Dr. Humphries worked as a kidney specialist, when she saw a connection between vaccinations and kidney damage.
She started questioning whether vaccines are safe and after doing a lot of research, she wrote a book together with Roman Bystrianyk called Dissolving Illusions, Disease, Vaccines and the Forgotten History. A book that thoroghly investigates what really reduced the death rate from different diseases that we currently vaccinate against.

Are vaccines safe? Dr Humphries gives her answer to that question by letting you decide yourself. She gives you the side of the story that is often suppressed, but necessary if you want to make your own balanced decision, and also what reduced some deadly diseases like cholera and tuberculosis in parts of the world without any vaccines at all.

Dr. Suzanne points out that she would never tell people not to vaccinate. She wants the people to listen to both sides, the for and against, and then make a decision themselves. She says the pro vaccine people are often aggressive and don't want you to hear the other side and often don’t even understand the down side to vaccination themselves.

Raggedy Ann is a character created by American writer Johnny Gruelle (1880–1938) in a series of books he wrote and illustrated for young children. Raggedy Ann is a rag doll with red yarn for hair and has a triangle nose. Johnny Gruelle received US Patent D47789 for his Raggedy Ann doll on September 7, 1915. The character was created in 1915 as a doll, and was introduced to the public in the 1918 book Raggedy Ann Stories. When a doll was marketed with the book, the concept had great success. A sequel, Raggedy Andy Stories (1920) introduced the character of her brother, Raggedy Andy, dressed in sailor suit and hat. Gruelle created Raggedy Ann for his daughter, Marcella, when she brought him an old hand-made rag doll and he drew a face on it. From his bookshelf, he pulled a book of poems by James Whitcomb Riley, and combined the names of two poems, "The Raggedy Man" and "Little Orphant Annie." He said, "Why don't we call her Raggedy Ann?"[1]

Marcella died at age 13, shortly after being vaccinated at school for smallpox without her parents' consent. Authorities blamed a heart defect, but her parents blamed the vaccination. Gruelle became an opponent of vaccination, and the Raggedy Ann doll was used as a symbol by the anti-vaccination movement.[2]
 
Raggedy Ann dolls were originally handmade. Later, PF Volland, a Gruelle book publisher, made the dolls. In 1935 Volland ceased operation and Ann and Andy were made under Gruelle's permission by Exposition Dolls, and without permission (during legal limbo) by MollyE's Dolls, resulting in Gruelle v (Mollye) Goldman.